I’m so into Kyle Platts. I want to be Kyle Platts. Kyle Platts Kyle Platts.

Seven Year Bitch - The Scratch

CARELESS LOVE, Johnny Cash & Bob Dylan

Always reminds me of my dad, camping, road trips, s’mores, tents, pines, good times.

Off the Radio

This is the music responsible for my learning that there is music in the world that does not get played on the radio.

I was raised by my dad in a very strict, sheltered, religious home. So when, at 16, I moved to Seattle to live with my (gasp! secular!) mom, one of the things I discovered was that there is a whole world of non-radio music. My mom’s brother-in-law handed me this Legendary Pink Dots CD and I listened to it, unimpressed.

(This is a photo of me about 2-3 months before I listened to these Legendary Pink Dots. My Grandma made me participate in a beauty pageant because “I needed to do something extra-curricular.” I hated it, and I hated this hair, but at least my friend Emily was in it with me for moral support. That’s my Sociology teacher Mrs. Neely in the background.)

Later, on a family outing at the Seattle Underground Tour, the tour guide mentioned liking The Legendary Pink Dots, which Mom’s brother-in-law thought was enchanting.

"I wonder how she got into them. Not many people know them."

"Um, the radio?" I said.

"OH NO. They don’t get played on the radio, Sherah.”

"Haha what."

"If you’re only listening to the radio, you’re missing out…"

He told me about all kinds of music I don’t remember.

I soon discovered Napster, and continued to have terribly uninformed taste in music for several years before burning through all kinds of crap to get to what is now, well, my taste.

A tip ‘o the hat to you, Legendary Pink Dots.

YELP REVIEWS OF A BRICK, A TWIG, AND THE 8TH CLICK SOUND MADE BY SIX FLAGS’ KINGDA KA ROLLERCOASTER DURING ITS INITIAL ASCENT.

5 Stars
Erica M.

I’ve been reading the Yelp reviews about this brick for a while now, and finally decided to go to McCoy’s and check it out. Let me just say: WOW, great brick! From the second I laid my eyes on it I could tell it had great porosity, and, as a load-bearing member of a larger set of bricks, it’s totally great and doing its job. Also, it doesn’t have a ton of excess mortar between itself and the bricks around it, which is a definite plus. I do not like excess mortar. If anyone is a little apprehensive because it’s a standard 2 1/4 by 3 3/4 by 8-inch brick, I totally get it. But I’m telling you it’s a good brick.

Read this.

Lessons Of Darkness - Werner Herzog (1992)

The theme of lost speech, beautiful landscapes, the throwback musical score, Herzog’s voice, I love this.

at Stinson Beach, Marin County, California

at Stinson Beach State Park

Sarah.

Cat sitting!

I just found out about this beautiful Flower Carpet in Brussels, and it is slaying me. Look at it!

Officially, the first Floral Carpet as its present-day form was created in 1971 on the Grand-Place by the landscape architect E. Stautemans, but, in fact, it was the culmination of a whole series created in various towns in Flanders.E. Stautemans, who was born in Zottegem, and graduated from the Ghent Horticultural College, had been experimenting since the early 50′s making simple small carpets, more like rugs, mainly consisting of begonias (in Knokke, Oudenaarde, Sint-Niklaas, Lille…).He very quickly realised that floral carpets would be an excellent vehicle for the promotion of his beloved begonias which he had always worked with, both technically, economically and aesthetically.

After years of attempts and calculations, this architect, who was inventive and imaginative, and knew how to make the most of the numerous resources of begonias, became an expert in the creation of superb floral carpets with sophisticated colors and complicated designs.His fame spread and he was asked to make carpets not only in Belgium (Ghent, Bruges, Antwerp, Ypres, Courtrai, Hasselt, Tongres, Mons, Durbuy, …) but worldwide (Cologne, Hamburg, Luxemburg, Paris, London, Breda, Amsterdam, The Hague, Vienna, Valencia, and as far afield as Buenos Aires and Colombus, Ohio).Some of these carpets were bigger than the ones created in Brussels (77 x 24 m), like the 1973 masterpiece at Sint-Pietersplein, Ghent that reached a gigantic 164 x 42 m.However, as E. Stautemas himself says, “Nowhere is the carpet more beautiful and distinguished than in the unique, ancient surroundings of the Grand-Place in Brussels”.
I just found out about this beautiful Flower Carpet in Brussels, and it is slaying me. Look at it!

Officially, the first Floral Carpet as its present-day form was created in 1971 on the Grand-Place by the landscape architect E. Stautemans, but, in fact, it was the culmination of a whole series created in various towns in Flanders.E. Stautemans, who was born in Zottegem, and graduated from the Ghent Horticultural College, had been experimenting since the early 50′s making simple small carpets, more like rugs, mainly consisting of begonias (in Knokke, Oudenaarde, Sint-Niklaas, Lille…).He very quickly realised that floral carpets would be an excellent vehicle for the promotion of his beloved begonias which he had always worked with, both technically, economically and aesthetically.

After years of attempts and calculations, this architect, who was inventive and imaginative, and knew how to make the most of the numerous resources of begonias, became an expert in the creation of superb floral carpets with sophisticated colors and complicated designs.His fame spread and he was asked to make carpets not only in Belgium (Ghent, Bruges, Antwerp, Ypres, Courtrai, Hasselt, Tongres, Mons, Durbuy, …) but worldwide (Cologne, Hamburg, Luxemburg, Paris, London, Breda, Amsterdam, The Hague, Vienna, Valencia, and as far afield as Buenos Aires and Colombus, Ohio).Some of these carpets were bigger than the ones created in Brussels (77 x 24 m), like the 1973 masterpiece at Sint-Pietersplein, Ghent that reached a gigantic 164 x 42 m.However, as E. Stautemas himself says, “Nowhere is the carpet more beautiful and distinguished than in the unique, ancient surroundings of the Grand-Place in Brussels”.
I just found out about this beautiful Flower Carpet in Brussels, and it is slaying me. Look at it!

Officially, the first Floral Carpet as its present-day form was created in 1971 on the Grand-Place by the landscape architect E. Stautemans, but, in fact, it was the culmination of a whole series created in various towns in Flanders.E. Stautemans, who was born in Zottegem, and graduated from the Ghent Horticultural College, had been experimenting since the early 50′s making simple small carpets, more like rugs, mainly consisting of begonias (in Knokke, Oudenaarde, Sint-Niklaas, Lille…).He very quickly realised that floral carpets would be an excellent vehicle for the promotion of his beloved begonias which he had always worked with, both technically, economically and aesthetically.

After years of attempts and calculations, this architect, who was inventive and imaginative, and knew how to make the most of the numerous resources of begonias, became an expert in the creation of superb floral carpets with sophisticated colors and complicated designs.His fame spread and he was asked to make carpets not only in Belgium (Ghent, Bruges, Antwerp, Ypres, Courtrai, Hasselt, Tongres, Mons, Durbuy, …) but worldwide (Cologne, Hamburg, Luxemburg, Paris, London, Breda, Amsterdam, The Hague, Vienna, Valencia, and as far afield as Buenos Aires and Colombus, Ohio).Some of these carpets were bigger than the ones created in Brussels (77 x 24 m), like the 1973 masterpiece at Sint-Pietersplein, Ghent that reached a gigantic 164 x 42 m.However, as E. Stautemas himself says, “Nowhere is the carpet more beautiful and distinguished than in the unique, ancient surroundings of the Grand-Place in Brussels”.

I just found out about this beautiful Flower Carpet in Brussels, and it is slaying me. Look at it!

Officially, the first Floral Carpet as its present-day form was created in 1971 on the Grand-Place by the landscape architect E. Stautemans, but, in fact, it was the culmination of a whole series created in various towns in Flanders.
E. Stautemans, who was born in Zottegem, and graduated from the Ghent Horticultural College, had been experimenting since the early 50′s making simple small carpets, more like rugs, mainly consisting of begonias (in Knokke, Oudenaarde, Sint-Niklaas, Lille…).
He very quickly realised that floral carpets would be an excellent vehicle for the promotion of his beloved begonias which he had always worked with, both technically, economically and aesthetically.

After years of attempts and calculations, this architect, who was inventive and imaginative, and knew how to make the most of the numerous resources of begonias, became an expert in the creation of superb floral carpets with sophisticated colors and complicated designs.
His fame spread and he was asked to make carpets not only in Belgium (Ghent, Bruges, Antwerp, Ypres, Courtrai, Hasselt, Tongres, Mons, Durbuy, …) but worldwide (Cologne, Hamburg, Luxemburg, Paris, London, Breda, Amsterdam, The Hague, Vienna, Valencia, and as far afield as Buenos Aires and Colombus, Ohio).
Some of these carpets were bigger than the ones created in Brussels (77 x 24 m), like the 1973 masterpiece at Sint-Pietersplein, Ghent that reached a gigantic 164 x 42 m.
However, as E. Stautemas himself says, “Nowhere is the carpet more beautiful and distinguished than in the unique, ancient surroundings of the Grand-Place in Brussels”.

Chris Isaak - Wicked Game

It’s happening again… (at Idle Hand Tattoo)